Eczema, which is a common skin condition in children, can affect adults as well. This chronic condition flares from time to time and usually subsides. Although there's no cure for eczema, many treatments and home remedies can help sooth itching while preventing new outbreaks. The top three treatments for eczema are corticosteroids, antihistamines and calcineurin inhibitors. Here's a closer look at the best eczema treatments and remedies to try if you're dealing with the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema.

Eczema, which is a common skin condition in children, can affect adults as well… cont. 

This chronic condition flares from time to time and usually subsides. Although there's no cure for eczema, many treatments and home remedies can help sooth itching while preventing new outbreaks. The top three treatments for eczema are corticosteroids, antihistamines and calcineurin inhibitors. Here's a closer look at the best eczema treatments and remedies to try if you're dealing with the uncomfortable symptoms of eczema.

One of the most common treatments for eczema is prescription corticosteroid creams and ointments. While over the counter hydrocortisone creams are available, they may only provide relief for individuals with mild eczema. Many patients require prescription strength creams or ointments to effectively treat moderate to severe eczema. It's important to avoid overuse of these medications, since overuse may result in skin discoloration or irritation. Oral antihistamines may help to relieve the symptoms of eczema, and since many of these medications cause sleepiness, they may be helpful for treating nighttime itching. For daytime relief, it's important to use non-drowsy antihistamines. When other treatments have not provided results, a physician may prescribe calcineurin inhibitors, which are creams that help repair skin by affecting the immune system. They help to reduce flares and control itching, but they do have potential side effects.

Many home remedies can be used to provide relief from the symptoms of eczema as well. One of the best remedies is to ensure you moisturize skin a couple times each day. The best time to use a moisturizer is right after a shower or bath when the skin is still damp. It's important to pay special attention to the back, sides, arms, and legs. A lubricating or oil may prove helpful if you already have dry skin. When dealing with eczema flares, cool, wet compresses may help to relieve itching, prevent scratching, and protect the skin. Warm baths, particularly with colloidal oatmeal or baking soda, may be helpful. Soak skin for about 10-15 minutes in the warm bath. Since emotional disorders and stress often make eczema worse, it's important to take measures to reduce stress and anxiety. It's important to keep skin moisturized, which means that a hot, dry climate can make your eczema worse. Using a humidifier will put more moisture into the air, which can help to relieve and prevent eczema. Keeping cool is also important, since heat can make symptoms worse. Wear cool, lightweight clothing and try to stay in a cool area as much as possible.

While the cause of eczema is unknown, experts believe that it's related to several factors. Factors that may contribute to eczema include environmental conditions, irritable, dry skin, gene variations, bacteria, and immune system dysfunctions. The most common symptom of eczema is itching, which is often very severe. The itching is often the worst at night. Eczema may also result in brownish-gray to red patches on the skin, particularly the ankles, hands, wrists, feet, upper chest, neck, knees, and elbows, Other symptoms may include cracked, dry skin, swollen, raw skin, and small raised bumps that have the potential to leak fluid and then crust over if they are scratched. Factors that may make symptoms worse include pollen, dust, sweat, stress, bacteria, scratching, dry skin, wool, cleaners, and tobacco smoke.